mindfulness in daily lifeI pledged on September 6, 2016 that I would devote myself to a simpler life on a daily basis which requires practicing mindfulness in daily life.

I have a reminder that pops up on my phone at 6:50 am every day that says "A Simple Life Project." By committing to daily reflection as to how I might simplify my life this day, I have noticed how important it is to be a gentle observer.

What is a gentle observer? The practice of mindfulness in daily life requires we practice observation without judgment.

If we dedicate ourselves to this mindfulness practice we have to learn how to observe in a gentle way. In other words, we notice what is happening inside of us and outside of us with a bubble of awareness between what's happening and any internal reaction we may have.

If we can manage to just be and breathe with what we observe including the internal reaction, we create a soft, gentle space where we can discern how or if we wish to respond rather than react.

Mindfulness in daily life is key to creating a simpler, more vibrant life. Here are 4 tips to being a gentle observer:

  1. Soften.

    We must become aware of how hard and tense we are in our expressions, our voice, our posture, our manner in order to become softer. There is tremendous strength in being soft.

    Mindfulness in daily life invites us soften into ourselves, our relationships and whatever is happening around us. Try right now. Notice what happens if you just think about the word SOFT and allow your facial muscles to grow soft, your shoulders to soften down, your breath to flow softly.

    Next, before you speak aloud, intentionally soften your voice and your mouth. Try walking softly rather than stomping about unconsciously.

  2. Breathe with awareness. 

    We are all breathing automatically but when we bring awareness to the breath we step into the practice of mindfulness in daily life.

    Begin by making it a habit to NOTICE your natural, automatic breath. Notice how it feels as it enters and exits your body.

    Befriend  your breath by checking in ongoing throughout your day. Play with deepening your inhales and extending your exhales for instant calm to your tense body and mind.

  3. Feel and express gratitude.

    At the end of all of the thousands of yoga classes I have taught over the years, I always guide students to bring hands together in the "prayer position" at the center of the chest and with eyes still closed in a relaxed seated position after deeply resting in savanna.

    Next, I suggest we seek a palpable sense of gratitude for the breath, the body and this day of being alive. Mindfulness in daily life is a practice that is enriched when we seek opportunity to feel and express gratitude. It might be gratitude toward the cashier at the grocery, or gratitude for the vibrant colors in nature out in our front yard, or gratitude for the opportunity to help someone who is struggling, or gratitude for a comfortable bed.

    If we can adopt a habit of feeling and saying "thank you," we begin to marinate in gratitude all of the time. And if we can marinate in gratitude all of the time we naturally experience a simpler life and the practice of mindfulness in daily life.

  4. Let go.

    I was leading a meditation class one Sunday and a long time student was expressing how hard it is to let go when she is so worried about her son who is making poor decisions as he prepares to leave the nest. I leaned in softly and replied, "This is letting go. . ." and I lifted my gripping fists and opened my hands and softened my fingers and wrists. I said, "Just release the grip."

    Her whole body and face softened in that moment as she realized she was creating her own suffering by gripping so tightly mentally, emotionally and physically.

    Letting go does not mean that we give up on our loved ones. Letting go does not mean that we become numb to the suffering of others. We can be dedicated to a project without gripping tightly. Mindfulness in daily life requires a regular practice of releasing the grip.

    My own spiritual teacher told me many years ago that clasping my child to my chest in a tight grip of worry is not love rather having arms wide open for the child to come to me if and when he chooses is love. We can adopt this same practice for ourselves in our daily life.

    By softening, breathing with awareness, feeling and expressing gratitude we are more able to release what no longer serves us and let go of the tight grip of anxiety. Practice clenching your fists very tightly - hold on for dear life! Now, release. Let go. Soften your hands and fingers.

Being a gentle observer is a practice of noticing with softness and then consciously choosing to continue to soften, breathe withe awareness, feel and express gratitude and let go of what you do not need to hold onto. This is the essence of mindfulness in daily life and key to having a simpler life.